Wednesday, 05 April 2017 11:47

Deliver Quality Dental Service with Your Dental Unit

Written by  DentalEZ
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One rule of patient comfort is never to let them see your tools. Another is to keep your joints and muscles from becoming damaged due to poor positioning of your equipment.

You need a delivery unit that can be ergonomically positioned while keeping instruments, syringes, and equipment out of the direct sight-line of the patient.

Positioning Your Dental Unit

The placement of the delivery unit impacts the way the dentist and technician work. Units can be placed to the rear of the patient, at the patient’s side, over the patient’s thorax, or over the patient’s head.

Rear, over-the-head, and over-the-thorax placements are all problematic. In each case, the dentist is forced to reach for tools out of range of vision and in a position that requires the muscles and joints to be stressed.

Over time, repetitive stress injuries, lower back problems, and other musculoskeletal problems appear, limiting the dentist’s working life.

You should not be required to shift your field of view while locating and retrieving instruments. In the meantime, your technician needs proximity to the most frequently used handpieces.

Potential mounting solutions include Magellan-mounting or mounting the unit to a fixed console that places it near the dentist's dominant side for left or right-handed dentistry. To increase productivity, your unit should be ideal for two- or four-handed practice. Select a unit with the brake-release handle on the side. A bonus is integrated dual access touch pads.

 Unit Design

The tray should lie securely in a groove-recessed border to prevent slipping. You do not want everything on the floor because you tried to move the unit or bumped it with an elbow. Be sure to have an adequate number of integrated handpiece holders available at the front of the unit. For aesthetic purposes, you can look for easy snap-on covers for unused holders. Place the air gauge where you can monitor pressure during procedures. A unit mounted on an aluminum flex arm is more stable and easy to position than one on a rigid arm or that is made of heavier material.

A separate assistant’s unit should be mounted to the rear and contain a centrally located solids collector. This unit is another opportunity to provide integrated touch-pad operation. The rear unit should be easily located wherever the assistant is sitting or standing. Look for a unit that was designed with extensive research and feedback from practicing dental hygienists and technicians.

The dental unit is the engine that drives treatment. It should have pride of ergonomic placement to enhance your ability to continue to perform.

If you are interested in learning more about the CORE delivery unit or any item in the CORE dental operatory, please visit www.dentalez.com/CORE, where you can view a video, download literature and schedule a CORE™ demo.

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